State Comptroller Thomas P. DiNapoli released a report on Tuesday detailing incidents of violence and disruptive behavior in New York State schools during the 2017-18 school year.  The report reveals that out of a student population of nearly 2.7 million, there were more than 32,000 violent and disruptive incidents reported for that school year.  That includes assaults, bomb threats and sexual offenses.

In response to the findings, DiNapoli said, "Violence of any kind has no place in our schools and the public rightly demands that school officials take the necessary steps to protect all students and faculty from threats."

The Safe Schools Against Violence in Education (SAVE) Act was adopted into law in 2000, a year after the tragic shooting at Columbine High School in Colorado and is meant to help make schools safer by requiring all state public schools, including charter schools, to document "violent and disruptive incidents" taking place on school property. It also requires the board of every school district, every board of cooperative educational services and every county vocational education and extension board, as well as the chancellor of the New York City school district, to develop comprehensive school safety plans.